Favorite Features in Summer ’14 that haven’t been mentioned yet

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Three times per year, Salesforce Santa visits with big PDF full of goodies for all of us admins and dev’s. A lot of the attention has been on the GA of flow triggers, as it rightly should because that is awesome, so I decied to talk about some features that are more admin / end user centric that seemed to have flown under the radar so far.

If you haven’t yet, you can get your Summer Release Notes here.

1)      Access Publisher Actions without Chatter Enabled (Page 183)

Sure, this is only for mobile only, Not just for mobile (Thanks Eanna Cunnane!), use these suckers everywhere! because in SFDC1 you can launch actions via the “+” icon!

Things to watch out for: The location of Global Actions has been changed.

2)      Edit Profile Details from Mobile (Page 43)

Very, Very nice and a long time coming. If you can approve stuff via the mobile, you should be able to change your profile information.

Things to watch out for: Only the user’s photo can be edited in the iOS app…wait, what?

3)      Log mobile calendar events in Salesforce using Today (Page 48)

This is going to be a huge timesaver for road warriors. I also think you will get some great adoption rates along with better data since data can now be captured at the moment rather than hours or days later.

Things to watch out for: User logging “Dentist Appointments” and other personal meetings

4)      Ask Questions in the Feed with Chatter Questions (Beta) (Page 82)

More engagement = Better Business. Even if you just us this for internal questions and answers it will boost adoption and increase engagement and good vibes.

Things to watch out for: It is just in Beta for the time being

5)      Give different types of rewards (Page 133)

Personally, I would use this by giving each individual a certain amount of reward funding that they can give out at their discretion. If you allow for immediate and tangible recognition, morale will be improved.

Things to watch out for: What is the reporting like? Can you create workflows?

6)      Keep favorite folders in view (Page 169)

Oh man, this is amazing. My org has a bajillion folders and it is a pain to manage.

Things to watch out for: “Hey, where did my folder go?” will be the highest volume request for a while.

7)      Expanded Approval History Reports (Page 190)

This is something that is sorely needed by both the business and technical teams. It is pretty cumbersome as of now to report on things like elapsed times.

Things to watch out for: Requests to make approvals more efficient (“Can you make an alert that goes out to PersonX every hour after they get a request”).

 

Anything I missed? Anything I am off the mark on? Don’t worry, still polishing post 2 of 3 on cleaner page layouts.

 

Andrew

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Reducing the amount of email while sending email

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In my post titled “Cleaning the data that matters – and not all data matters” I finished the post up with the following:

“PS – For bonus points, create a nice email alert telling the reps their data is bad, and make it so it sends them that notice every time they edit the account OR opportunity…just put on a timer so it only sends once per day!”

To which, JaneIsaac replied:

“nice detective work. Could you share What the timer formula look like?”

Well JaneIsaac, this post if for you!

Not that type of request

I take requests…just not freebird!

The scenariois that we wanted to send out alerts if an account scored low data grade points and that account OR an opportunity related to that account was updated. After some quick research I saw that the updates were clustered, often receiving multiple updates in a short period of time. I didn’t want the alerts constantly kicking out.

So I built out a function so that prevent multiple alerts from being sent out in a given set of time. My functionality treats account and opportunity updates as two different actions, so I broke them out on this blog as such. Listing out the ingredients below and I will dissect the basic functionality after.

Must be about snack time...

Ingredients for tasty food, not tasty Workflows

For the Account alerts:

1 – Date field on Account “Data Alert Sent Date”

1 – Workflow rule for the Account Object “Data Grade Alert”:

Evaluation Criteria = “Evaluate the rule when a record is created, and any time it’s edited to subsequently meet criteria”

Rule Criteria =

Account WorkFlow Criteria

AND(
AND(Account_Data_Grade__c <>”Acceptable”,Account_Data_Grade__c <>”Excellent”),
Open_Pipeline__c < 1,
AND(LastModifiedBy.ProfileId <>” xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx “,LastModifiedBy.ProfileId <>” xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx “,LastModifiedBy.ProfileId <>” xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx “, LastModifiedBy.ProfileId <>”xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx”),
(DATEVALUE(CreatedDate)<>Today()),
OR(ISBLANK(Data_Alert_Sent_Date__c),(Data_Alert_Sent_Date__c) <> today()))

2 – Immediate Workflow Actions

All about that (Account Workflow) action Boss

1 – Workflow email alert Sendemail to “Last Modified By”

Account Workflow Alert

       1 – Field Update “Data Alert Sent Date” with Today()

Account Field Update

 For the Opportunity alerts:

1 – Date field on Opportunity “Data Alert Sent Date”

1 – Workflow rule for the Opportunity Object “Data Grade Alert”:

Evaluation Criteria = “Evaluate the rule when a record is created, and any time it’s edited to subsequently meet criteria”

Rule Criteria =

Opportunity Workflow Criteria

AND(
AND(Account.Account_Data_Grade__c <>”Acceptable”,Account.Account_Data_Grade__c <>”Excellent”),
AND(LastModifiedBy.ProfileId <>” xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx “,LastModifiedBy.ProfileId <>” xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx “,LastModifiedBy.ProfileId <>” xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx “, LastModifiedBy.ProfileId <>” xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx “),
Record_Type__c =”Open Opportunity”,
(DATEVALUE( Account.CreatedDate )<>Today()),
or(ISBLANK( Data_Alert_Sent_Date__c ), (Data_Alert_Sent_Date__c)<>TODAY()))

2 – Immediate Workflow Actions

All about that (Opportunity Workflow) action Boss

1 – Workflow email alert Send email to “Last Modified By”

Opportunity Email Alert

          1 – Field Update = “Data Alert Sent Date” with Today()

Opportunity Field Update

Taking a look at the mechanics:

I wish my cube was this cool...or that I had a flying monkey!

I wish my cube was this cool…or that I had a flying monkey!

The rule criteria’s are similar enough that we won’t have to dissect them both and since the interest is in the timer components, that is what I am going to focus on:

1)      (DATEVALUE( Account.CreatedDate )<>Today()) –  Ignore if the account is newly created

2)      But, the following situations are OK:

  1. (ISBLANK( Data_Alert_Sent_Date__c ) – The data alert sent date is Null (Never triggered before)
  2. (Data_Alert_Sent_Date__c)<>TODAY() – The data alert sent date does not equal Today()

This last line is what ensures that an alert will only send once per day. If the rule runs, (Data Quality = Poor and “Data Alert Sent Date” <>Today()), then the email alert gets sent out and the “Data Alert Sent Date” gets updated with the current day. If that record was updated ANY OTHER TIME during that day, the rule will not fire. I know I say this all the time, but what I really (Really) like about salesforce is that when it comes down to it, you can do some crazy cool stuff with zero code.

Clicks Not Code!

In other CRM’s, the above functionality takes 6 weeks and 2 developers.

 

Looking at this functionality now, I think a couple neat additions would have been:

1)      A rollup summary on opportunity.Data_Alert_Sent_Date__c (MAX), this way, you could have the account rule also looking at the last time an alert was sent out on ANY opportunity.

2)      A counter field update on the opportunity rule with a corresponding rollup on accounts. This would allow for reporting on ignored updates and thresh holding of the alerts.

But, the fun with Salesforce is the ability to rapidly prototype and tinker, so if I wanted to add in some new stuff, it is easy – peasy – lemon squeezy.

Well, hope you enjoyed this. I certainly had fun taking a look at something that was built out quite some time ago but continues to keep ticking! If there are any special requests, just let me know!

Cleaner Page Layouts using Flows and Formulas (1 of 3)

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Back in the day, when I was just a transfer student at Everett Community College, “one week” was a hit single and I was a newbie coder taking visual basic.

(Your welcome for this ear worm)

During this class, we had a discussion on page layouts, that went a little something like this:

If you design a layout that has a bad tab order, and it reduces the speed of a transaction by one second, is it a big deal? Well, consider it this way: If your software is bought by a million people, and they can complete 500 transactions a day, your one second reduction of efficiency is costing the consumer 500000000 seconds per day…which is 8,333,333 minutes or 138,888 hours. If the average wage of those users is ten dollars an hour, your one second in efficiency now has cost 1.3million dollars per day.

Not even a Lego Calculator could make that discussion cool

With guilt trip thusly set to “argh”, I focused my efforts on UI design and making things work efficiently. Even now, I can remember the tab order of one of my first CRM’s I worked on…because it was out of order.

The stakes have changed since I was taking Visual Basic. I (we) support sales, and lost productivity is not simply about lost time, but about what your sales teams COULD have been doing. The math is pretty easy…and pretty scary:

Time spent clicking / scrolling / using salesforce in an inefficient manner

X by Number of times

X by Number of Users

X by days in year

= Time wasted = Money Lost = No free coffee

For the sake of this blog post, I am going to clean up the contact layout. I have sat with my users and estimated that they waste about 2 seconds every time they hit the layout  because of a section that Marketing has requested. This section consists of four check boxes, three text boxes and one URL field in a two column layout. This section was created for marketing and was placed near to the top of the layout in return for the data not being required. This section pushed a much more used section down below the scroll line (IE, users would have to scroll to see it). Marketing has given the OK on making this section not visible as long as there is some visual refernce to these fields still on the page layout.

A user will typically hit the contact layout 25 times per day and I have 25 users. If I can compact the layout, I should be able to reduce scroll time by about half, which should save about 45 (sales) hours per year. Notice, I didn’t just say hours, I said sales hours. Sure, saving 45 regular hours might not be much in the whole scheme of things, but sales hours is like a force multiplier. If you enabled your sales teams to have even a few more minutes per week, they can make a few more calls, make a few more emails, make a few more dollars.

Take a minute to enjoy this worn out cat.

Phew

I am beat just writing about this!

I am going to break this whole thing out into three distinct chunks:

1)      Create the Summarizing Formulas (In this blog)

2)      Create the Visual Prompts (Next Blog)

3)      Make Data Entry awesome with Flows (Next Next Blog)

Summarizing Formulas

Personally, I tend to write smaller, nested formulas that analyze bits and pieces of data. This makes it a bit easier (in my opinion) to write that final formula that presents the results to the user. While you could probably write this all in one huge formula, for the sake of troubleshooting and scalability, I am going to create the following fields:

1)      Create a formula to look at the 3 text fields (Return Type is Text)

Text(

if(len(Test_Text_1__c)>0,1,0)+

if(len(Test_Text_2__c)>0,1,0)+

if(len(Test_Text_3__c)>0,1,0))&” out of 3 populated; ”

Text Box Formula

2)      Create a formula to look at the URL field (Return Type is Text)

if(len(Test_URL__c)>0,”URL Present”,”URL Not Present”)

URL Formula

3)      Create a formula to look at the check box fields (Return Type is Text)

Text(

if(Example_Check_Box1__c=TRUE,1,0)+

if(Example_Check_Box_2__c=TRUE,1,0)+

if(Example_Check_Box_3__c=TRUE,1,0)+

if(Example_Check_Box_4__c=TRUE,1,0))&” out of 4 set to True; “Check Box Formula

4)      Create a formula to aggregate the above

Check_Example_CheckBox__c &” “& Check_Test_Text__c &” “& Check_Test_URL__cAggregate Formula

The net result is a field that will present the user with data facts not data entry points. Aside from having a cleaner layout, I a firm believer that if presented with text, most humans brains at least acknowlege that text before moving on. By reducing the clutter, you are making your overall page layout less fatiguing.

End Result

Individual Results

In the next post, I am going to discuss how we are going to visually prompt the user to give us data, but until then consider the other benefits of this type of functionality:

1) You could use these fields in reports to give better summaries

2) You could write validation rules off of these formulas rather than the individual fields

3) You could write workflows off of these formulas

See you all next week, same BatTime, same BatChannel where I will show you all how to kick it up a notch and grab your users attention!

Kick it up a notch

You totally thought I was doing Batman pic, weren’t you?

Andrew

My two cents on the Salesforce / Microsoft Mashup

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Back in the day (Dreamforce 2010) there was a full blown nerd version of sharks vs jets going on. Benioff said choice words like “”There’s an old industry … and they’re trying to do everything they can to stop this,”” . Fast forward to now and the big news is Microsoft and Salesforce are partnering up.

Mind…Blown…

Mind...Blown

Literally, my eyes were like this

I have been chewing on this news for a week now and figured it was time for me to weigh in.

1)      This is great news for both companies. Salesforce is sometimes not exactly treated as a full on enterprise app, and Microsoft doesn’t always have the best reputation. By par   tnering with Microsoft, and by proxy SQL and inhouse data, Salesforce gains some legitimacy with old skool IT folks. Microsoft gets access to some of the most loyal geeks around (#wetweetalot)

wonder twin nerd powers activate

Old Skool IT & #ClicksNotCodeFTW

2)      This is great news for both companies (Sales). Having a better integration to Outlook and Excel, which, let’s be honest here are still the most prevalent CRM, breaks down the barriers to entry for Salesforce. By having a tighter integration to Salesforce, Microsoft plays a long game against other communication / app companies that a business might be tempted to look at. In otherwords, Microsoft is going to make more money keeping businesses in tight with Office then they will with Dynamics.

3)      This is great news for admins. I really don’t like the outlook integration as it stands now and part of that is outlooks fault. If it becomes less “installed after thought” functionality and more “Click and Work” functionality, then I have happier coworkers.

So, who are the losers in this deal?

1)      Any CRM provider not named Dynamics or Salesforce. I would be shocked if some sort of connector for Dynamics to Salesforce isn’t released, which will help Dynamics with CRM and Salesforce with ERP. The “Magic Quadrant” for CRM is already DOMINATED by the two companies, this will only keep that dominance rolling.

SAP being in the magic quadrant shook my faith in humanity

2)      Any software guy who’s last name is Ellison. Really though, the dude doesn’t worry. Oracle has so many fingers in so many pies, it is nuts. Though, Ellison does tend to try to buy out companies he finds intersting / a threat, so there is that. Like the saying goes, “No one ever got fired for buying Oracle”…Err, take that back, someone from the State of Oregon might be fired (or at least talked to in a stern voice).

Enjoy your cubicle.

 

 

Overall, I am excited to see where this goes.

Cleaning the data that matters…and not all data matters!

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In my previous post, I alluded to a list of 5 concepts that make data cleansing a bit easier (Not fun, not easy – peasy but easier). In this post, I am going to expand on the concepts of “Knowing your data” and “Classify your data”

It's about half the battle

GI Joe talks about knowing

.But, before we get into the methodology and the doing, let’s talk about tools used. We are actually only using two tool to build out the functionality found with in this post, reports and formulas. However, because the methodologies discussed below is different than most organizations approach to cleaning data (Ocean…Boiling) there will be work on you to get folks bought into the ideas of not just trying to clean everything. So, I guess if you want to get technical, a third tool is the soft grey matter inside your noggin!

First things first. To help me “Know” and “Classify” my data, I am going to write a report that has two bucket fields, “Customer” and “Pipeline”. The bucket fields are looking at two custom field that are rollups counting the number of booked opportunities and the number of open opportunities. These are my two primary classifications because I am going to use a combination of these two classifications to score the value of an account to my company.

1)      Non Customer, No Pipeline (Least Valuable)

2)      Non Customer, Pipeline

3)      Customer, No Pipeline

4)      Customer, Pipeline (Most Valuable)

My fictional org for “Kramerica” wants all 481k of their accounts cleaned. Before jumping in and just starting to cleanse, I set up a report that breaks down an account based on past purchases and pipeline. Just by using two bucket fields, I can see that 14,000 accounts (About 3%) that are high value (Customer with Pipeline), 13,000 (3%) are medium value (Non Customer with Pipeline) and 54,000 accounts (11%) that are medium value (Customer No Pipe or Non Customer Pipe). I have just reduced the pool of accounts that should be cleansed by nearly 83%.

Numbers don't lie

Dry those eyes, it is not as bad as it seems

Unfortunately, there is still a number that is not very friendly standing between us and Maragriatville.

Margaritaville is real, google maps told me!

Which is just outside of Dallas apparently.

So, we are going to take things up a notch and write a set of formulas that will score the data that is entered on our account records. The folks in charge of data management (and that might be you), decided that Address, Phone and Website were most important. Yeah, I didn’t put state / country, but that is because of the change making it a picklist field, and we will just assume Kramerica is using the picklists. I am going to end up creating four formula fields. Three formulas will look at the data contained in the three fields. The fourth field will sum the scores of the three fields and then based on the totals, grade the data “Good”, “Acceptable” and “Poor”. The formulas don’t have to be complex, even something basic like if(len(FIELD=0,1,0), which will check for the presence of any data in those fields.

Just the ones that matter

In this case, red is good because red = less work!

That was a fun diversion, now, go back to the original reports with primary / secondary classifications. We add in the data grading field. Now, you can see how many of your most valuable accounts actually need the most help. In the case of Kramerica, we want to distil down that 14% (68k accounts) even further so we can focus on valuable accounts that have a data score of zero (no values in any of the fields) or one (at least one field has some data in it). Applying the formulas and the buckets to my data set reduces the amount of accounts I need to look at from 54,000 to 18,000.

I think this deserves a quick, bullet pointed recap:

–        Initial data set, 480k accounts

–        Valuable Accounts:

o   Customer / Pipeline (Most) 14,000

o   Pipeline / Non Customer 13,000

o   Customer / No Pipeline 54,000

–        Data scoring of valuable accounts:

o   Zero data score = 5,000

o   One data score = 13,000

–        Reduced my “need to clean” by nearly 90+%

My SFDC admin is amazing

I get this way whenever I shake loose a bit more time in the day.

Yeah, that is pretty awesome. However, there is the question of what do to with all those “other” accounts. Here is where it goes from awesome to AWESOME (in a monster truck voice). Since you have already established what makes an account valuable, once an account meets a certain threshold (gets pipeline), you know that it then needs to be cleaned up…and of course, you know what needs to be cleaned up because you are already scoring it.

2014-06-01 20_51_21-awesome monster truck - Google Search

 

PS – For bonus points, create a nice email alert telling the reps their data is bad, and make it so it sends them that notice every time they edit the account OR opportunity…just put on a timer so it only sends once per day!